VIS OPEN CALL #5

The theme for the issue is “One more time, let's do it again!”.

Open Call for VIS Issue 5

The call is open between 17 February and 1 June 2020.

Theme “One more time, let's do it again!” – Trond Lossius, Editor of VIS Issue 5

The OECD Frascati Manual defines five criteria that all research and development work must meet. The fifth of these is that the activity must be "transferable and/or reproducible" [1]. Reproducibility has revealed itself to be thornier than previously perceived, and the last decade has seen something of a "reproducibility crisis" in several scientific disciplines [2]. This crisis also extends to the humanities [3].

There are reasons to question whether it is legitimate to deploy such scientifically-oriented research concepts in artistic research [4]. Taking the interpretation of classical music repertoire as an example, is it at all meaningful to consider this highly individualised activity in relation to scientific ideas of replication? Do not musical interpretations instead negotiate an artistic field of tensions and possibilities between remaining ‘true to tradition’ and ‘breaking new ground’, between respecting the intentions of past artists and craving space for interpretative freedom, always resulting in something new?

Rather than engaging with the question of reproducibility, VIS Issue #5 will reflect on what "doing it again" may lead to in artistic research. Doing something again is integral to many artistic practices. The performing arts require rehearsal (répétition in French). Once adequately rehearsed, performances are commonly given several times over [5]. Other artists engage with a series of works, or revisit a motif, topic or question over and over again. Works of art may benefit from "a second chance", not least in artistic research. Repetitions might be the result of deliberate choices or emerge as recurrences within the practice [6]. Artists may "do again" within their own practice or engage with the work of others through reading, restaging, referencing, reproducing, appropriating, reusing, sampling, or re-enacting [7].

Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt suggest that "repetition is a form of change" [8]. What insights may emerge by doing something again and again, repeatedly, over a long period? How may artistic research draw upon and benefit from such iterations? We invite expositions of artistic research where "doing it again" is of importance, and we invite contributors to expose the artistic research questions, contexts, practices and outcomes in which repetition manifests itself, reflecting upon how "doing it again" may contribute to practice, to research, insights and to knowledge production.

(The title for this call cites the lyrics from a song by Röyksopp and Robyn [9].)

[1] OECD. (2015). Frascati Manual 2015. Guidelines for collecting and reporting data on research and experimental development. The measurement of scientific, technological and innovation activities. Paris: OECD Publishing, p. 45.
[2] Baker, M. (2016). 1,500 scientists lift the lid on reproducibility. Nature, 533(7604), 452–454. https://doi.org/10.1038/533452a
[3] Peels, R., & Bouter, L. (2018). The possibility and desirability of replication in the humanities. Palgrave Communications, 4(1), 95. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-018-0149-x
[4] Ruiten, S. van, Wilson, M., & Borgdorff, H. (Eds.). (2013). SHARE: Handbook for artistic research education (Amsterdam, ELIA), p. 25.
[5] Crispin, Darla, Hultqvist, Anders and Lagerström, Cecilia (Eds). (2016). Repetitions and Reneges, PARSE Journal, 3, 7-11 (Gothenburg, University of Gothenburg). https://parsejournal.com/article/introduction-to-repetitions-and-reneges/
[6] Bandlien, B. Å. (2019). PhD-project: Recurrences - a method and practice within dance and choreography (2016-). Retrieved 15 December 2019, from PhD-project: Recurrences -a method and practice within dance and choreography (2016-) website: https://khioda.khio.no/khio-xmlui/handle/11250/2425899
[7] Refer to the topic of VIS Issue #3 History Now.
[8] Eno, B., & Schmidt, P. (2001). Oblique Strategies. Over one hundred worthwhile dilemmas (5th ed.) [Deck of cards].
[9] Berge, S., Brundtland, T., & Robyn. (2014). Do it again. Arts & Crafts. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btBSxtKzF6Q

How to submit an exposition

To apply for the open call: create, design and submit an exposition (in draft) using the Research Catalogue (RC). You need to register a full account in RC. On the RC, click ”create exposition” and use the help offered in RC-guides, tutorials and RC-support. Submit your exposition to the VIS Portal Page in RC (in the menu, choose “Submit for publication” and then choose the portal “VIS – Nordic Journal for Artistic Research”, confirm by “Submit”).

You should consider your “exposition-draft” as only a proposal. You can leave notes within the draft that explain further developments and ideas. If your proposal is chosen by the Editorial Committee, you will be invited to further develop it into a complete exposition. The submitted full exposition will be peer-reviewed. You will have about 4-5 months for further development, editing and peer-reviewing before publication in VIS Journal.

The Editorial Committee selects seven contributions to each issue of VIS.

Contact us for more info:
visjournal@uniarts.se

Checklist for submissions

  1. The exposition-draft must include the author’s full name, a title and an abstract. Where the exposition uses a language other than English, an English translation of the abstract is required.
  2. The exposition-draft should outline the artistic research, how the artistic research will be exposed and how the exposition will make use of Research Catalogue as a publishing platform. It is recommended that the exposition-draft is developed beyond a text-only abstract to give examples of how and what media will be incorporated.
  3. Submissions may be made in Swedish, Norwegian, Danish and English.
  4. Your exposition should not have been published previously. If only certain parts of the exposition have been published, this is acceptable. Please describe in the submission how and when partial previous publication has taken place.
  5. Copyright issues: be sure that you have taken care of any ownership/rights issues pertaining to any material that you add to your exposition.

We also strongly recommend you to consider the following:

  • Use Chicago style for references.
  • Be sure that the links are working; external links should be opened in a new window
  • Typography – use only common fonts that works in different browsers. (We suggest Arial, Helvetica, Times, Courier, Verdana, Georgia)
  • Test the exposition in different browsers
  • Hide scrolling bars (if possible)
  • Don’t insert images within text-boxes (to avoid overlapping in different browsers and version)

The Editorial Committee of VIS considers the following when selecting expositions

  • How well the exposition proposal relates to the theme of the issue of VIS
  • The general quality and relevance of the artistic research
  • Whether the exposition takes place within artistic practices and contributes to further research
  • Whether the exposition contributes to insight, knowledge and awareness of methods, ethics and context in artistic processes
  • Whether the exposition proposal is conceived for the benefit both of those within the field and those beyond the sphere of artistic research.

How to use Research Catalogue

The RC functions as a platform for the dissemination of self-published content as well as peer-reviewed publications. The RC hosts a number of journals and institutional publications that are peer-reviewed.

To be able to participate in VIS, you need to register an account in Research Catalogue (RC). Peer-Reviewers register a "basic account" to be able to participate in the review-process. Authors need to register a "full account" to be able to create expositions. RC is free of charge.

Learn how to create expositions with the RC-guides. Some institutions that are portal partners in RC gives lessons in how to use the publishing tool. Portal partners in RC can be found here. When you have a registered account in RC you are able to share your exposition with different contributors.

Register in RC

RC-guide (short)

RC-guide (extended)

Peer-Review-process

VIS holds an open call for every issue. 7 expositions will be selected by the Editorial Committee. As described above, all expositions are created in the database Research Catalogue.

If your submission is selected for consideration by the Editorial Committee, an external peer-reviewer will be chosen to evaluate it. The peer-review will take approx. 2 months; the review process will be partly dialogue-based so that it may be collaborative and developmental as well as evaluative. After peer-reviewing, you will have the opportunity to carry out further work on the exposition and you will get in copy-edited before submitting it for publication.

Are you a potential peer-reviewer?

VIS is interested in exploring new ideas for the process of peer-review in artistic research. Models that combine rigorous scrutiny of work with a collaborative and developmental process are of particular interest to the Committee.

As a peer reviewer for VIS, you will be an expert in your own field and have a solid knowledge of what artistic research means. It is a great advantage if you are experienced with the exposition format in the database Research Catalogue or have peer-reviewed expositions and articles in experimental and unconventional formats.

Do you fit this profile and does the process of collaborative and developmental review appeal to you? If so, please send your expression of interest, accompanied by an up-to-date curriculum vitae, to: visjournal@uniarts.se